William Tallman arrived in Bozeman in 1901 to become chair (and sole member) of the mathematics department. At the time, fewer than fifty full-time students attended what was then known as Montana State College. He and his wife Anna built this…

With its gambrel roof, multiple dormers, shingle siding, and semicircular arches in the gable ends, this prominent Shingle style residence stands out among Joliet’s more modest homes. When Guy and Cora Lovering purchased the house in 1907, it was…

In 1930, three years after building the Ranger’s House, the Forest Service constructed this one-and-one-half-story, shingle-clad building. First used as a warehouse, it features a high gambrel roof and a screened-in single-story entrance porch.…

In 1917-18, the Forest Service recognized the Big Creek Ranger Station as the “most important secondary protection station site in the Lower North Fork district.” Ten years later, the Forest Service reinforced the designation by building this…

Attorney John B. Wellcome, later implicated in the illegal shenanigans orchestrated by William Clark in his bid for the U.S. Senate, probably built this residence before he sold the property to Henry G. Hawes in 1890. This impressive Shingle style…

Marcus Daly’s taste influenced Hamilton, a town the copper king founded to supply timber to his Butte mines. Daly liked the Shingle style, and his Anaconda Company carpenters incorporated Shingle style elements into several Hamilton residences.…

The Shingle style was just past its prime when an unknown architect designed this stellar example in 1901. The style, a uniquely American adaptation of several architectural traditions, achieved its distinctive look by emphasizing an asymmetrical…