Bozeman real estate and insurance broker Edward M. Gardner and city treasurer George Willson commissioned this extended family home in 1907. George was married to Edward’s stepdaughter Florence and the two families—including five Willson boys—shared…

Martin J. Plumb, wife Nancy, and their two grown children moved into their new bungalow in the fall of 1916. Builders Glenn Knodle and Frank McCabe built the house using catalog home plans and lumber from Kenyon-Noble Lumber Company. The house was…

The 1915 Panama-California Exposition in San Diego raised the profile of the Mission style, and the style became popular among cosmopolitan Montanans through the 1930s. Built in 1909, this two-story Mission Style home, patterned on Southern…

John P. Gary came to Montana from Michigan with his brother, sister, and widowed mother. The Garys settled in Bozeman where John and his brother Martin opened a grocery store in 1900. Both brothers married and both established households on South…

South Central Avenue—renamed Willson Avenue in 1920—was the heart of Bozeman’s earliest residential neighborhoods. Elegant homes appeared along the avenue with the advent of the Northern Pacific Railroad. This home dates to that first period of…

Queen Anne style details distinguish this home built for civil engineer Fred M. Brown and his wife Mary in 1908. Brown’s father, J. N. Brown—a prominent local contractor and brick maker—likely supplied the brick, but the architectural details of…

The design for this two-and-one-half-story home came from architect D. S. Hopkins, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, who published numerous “pattern books” of architectural plans. The Queen Anne style defines the residence, which features an asymmetrical…

William Tallman arrived in Bozeman in 1901 to become chair (and sole member) of the mathematics department. At the time, fewer than fifty full-time students attended what was then known as Montana State College. He and his wife Anna built this…