A major fire that destroyed ninety percent of Havre’s business district in 1904 also sparked the town’s transformation from a frontier community to a Progressive-era town. Rebuilding Havre coincided with a nationwide reform movement that promoted…

The five-story Masonic Temple was Havre’s largest building at the time of its opening in 1916. Its solid massing follows a longstanding Masonic tradition of erecting lodges whose size and bulk symbolize the permanency and stability of masonry…

The Great Northern Railway transported people and goods to, and through, northern Montana in the late 1880s and early 1900s. By the mid-1920s, however, automobile travel eclipsed rail travel. Soon, modern roads and new roadside service stations,…

Born in Quebec, Exzelia Pepin followed his uncle Simon Pepin—Havre’s town founder—to Montana in 1888, a year after the Great Northern Railway reached Fort Assinniboine. Not long after, the Great Northern decided to build a division point at what was…

Joseph and Susanne Gussenhoven built this two-and-one-half-story Free Classic Queen Anne style home, known locally as “the Castle,” in 1903. Particular to this style are the irregular roofline, octagonal corner tower, textured walls, large porches,…

With its graceful dormer and full-length front porch supported by Tuscan columns, the front of this one-story, hipped-roof building looks like an attractive and comfortable residence. The back of the building, with its small, arched barred windows…

The bars on the windows of this single-story hipped-roof building weren’t put there to keep people in, but to keep them out. Forty-five caliber Colt revolvers, single-shot Springfield rifles or Krag-Jorgenson rifles after 1892, cannon, and a Gatling…

Load-bearing brick walls three courses thick, a wood-framed gable roof, and metal rain gutters are among the surviving historic features of this 1906 stable. The fort originally had six stables, built between 1879 and 1881, that accommodated…