A wood-frame cigar factory and shooting gallery stood here in 1884. After fire destroyed the buildings in 1886, owner J. A. Danforth quickly rebuilt in brick. Four years later, he added a second story, but the addition was so heavy it damaged the…

In 1883, Wetzstein Hall, a two-story wooden building with a liquor wholesale operation on the first floor and a public hall on the second, stood on this site. In 1902, Fred Pape opened the National Park Steam Laundry here. He purchased the building…

Entrepreneur brothers Tommy and Billy Miles constructed this dignified building in 1903 strategically located across from the Northern Pacific’s new passenger depot. The first floor of the masonry business block provided the booming community with…

As the Northern Pacific Railroad made its push across the upper tier of the western states in the early 1880s, Livingston grew to serve its passengers and crews. Convenient to the shops and yards, the Eastside especially was home to the many blue…

Blue collar railroad workers were the backbone of the Livingston community and many settled in this area opposite the Northern Pacific shops. Between 1900 and 1910, housing for workers began to fill this neighborhood to accommodate the railroad’s…

In April 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt laid the cornerstone for the Roosevelt Arch, a massive, Rustic style monument that symbolically marked the entrance into Yellowstone National Park. The only such grand entranceway into a national park, the…