A steep-roofed gable-front cottage with a wraparound porch stood on this lot by 1901. Sometime before 1907 Rose Robbins—who owned the one-and-one-half-story home along with many other lots in the neighborhood—expanded the residence, adding a rear…

When John Harrington sold this lot in 1888, he reserved the right to mine within twenty feet of the surface—without reinforcing his mine with timbers. Understandably, the purchasers, miner Con Ambrose and his wife Sarah, built a functional,…

Outlying settlements like Centerville sprang up so that miners could live near their work. Perched on the slope, Centerville’s steep streets witnessed many a wild winter bobsled ride down the long hill. A clanging bell cleared the way of horse-drawn…

Founded for the railroad, Forsyth’s residential neighborhoods were platted in 1882 but much of the land lay undeveloped until the 1900s. Forsyth’s first-generation homes were simple dwellings rapidly constructed of wood or log to serve the immediate…

Although Sam Lucas only lived in Hamilton for ten years, he left his mark on the community. Copper king Marcus Daly hired the Kentucky horse trainer in 1890 to work at his Bitter Root Stock Farm. Nothing was too good for Daly’s race horses, and…

Unlike many neighborhoods in railroad towns, the lots here in Urlin’s Addition were not owned and developed by the Northern Pacific, but sold to private individuals who built rental housing for railroad employees. This gable-front vernacular style…

Norwegian brothers Theodore and Andrew Reed arrived in Missoula in 1907. The ambitious and experienced carpenters purchased multiple building lots in the Knowles Addition and set to work. They built this one-and-one-half-story gable-front residence…

Nestled in the forested mountains of the Clark Fork River valley, this early-twentieth-century church recalls the era when prosperity rode the rails of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway Company. As the tracks of the “Milwaukee Road” were…

The first two decades of the twentieth century saw railroad promotion and homesteaders settling along Montana’s Hi-Line. Chester was one of the first communities to spring up along the new Great Northern Railway line in the 1890s. The town…

Early settlers along the gulch made use of the natural landscape by building their homes into the hillside for convenient, climate-controlled storage and maximum space. This gable-front-and-wing style home, built circa 1893, follows this practice.…