When John Harrington sold this lot in 1888, he reserved the right to mine within twenty feet of the surface—without reinforcing his mine with timbers. Understandably, the purchasers, miner Con Ambrose and his wife Sarah, built a functional,…

Outlying settlements like Centerville sprang up so that miners could live near their work. Perched on the slope, Centerville’s steep streets witnessed many a wild winter bobsled ride down the long hill. A clanging bell cleared the way of horse-drawn…

Although Sam Lucas only lived in Hamilton for ten years, he left his mark on the community. Copper king Marcus Daly hired the Kentucky horse trainer in 1890 to work at his Bitter Root Stock Farm. Nothing was too good for Daly’s race horses, and…

Unlike many neighborhoods in railroad towns, the lots here in Urlin’s Addition were not owned and developed by the Northern Pacific, but sold to private individuals who built rental housing for railroad employees. This gable-front vernacular style…