Cabinet and furniture makers also made caskets, and so the two businesses often went hand in hand. Furniture dealer James E. Graves purchased H. C. Plimpton’s long-established furniture and undertaking business in the 1920s. In 1929, Graves moved…

Accompanied by popular singing evangelist C. M. Ridenour of Fort Benton, J. S. Raum preached the Christian Church’s first service in Miles City in 1910. Forty-four people attended. Early church membership was diverse, including a successful…

Determined to bring the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad to Miles City, land developer, cattleman, and banker Lorenzo Stacy organized his fellow businessmen to secure and donate property for the railroad’s right-of-way. In 1908, the…

Builder/contractor Oren M. Lanphear experimented with a variety of influences in this 1908 residence, which was the first home in Miles City to fully employ the American Foursquare design. Simplicity and practicality were the essence of this…

Nature, comfort, simplicity, honesty, and integrity were ideals incorporated into early-twentieth-century architecture. This Craftsman style bungalow is an exceptional expression of those ideals. Its compact floorplan and modestly adorned exterior…

A low-pitched hipped roof, an asymmetrical open front porch with massive square porch supports, clean lines, and wide overhanging eaves mark the two-story Pope residence as a classic example of the Prairie style. Builder Thomas Burton clad the…

Built for C. N. and Louise E. Lukes in 1911, the home is also known as the Ed Love House. Lukes was cashier of the Commercial State Bank and after the deaths of C. N. and Louise in 1929, ownership passed to their daughter, Doris Lukes Love, and her…

Wealthy Miles City residents looked to the undeveloped area east of the Northern Pacific tracks to build their homes in the early twentieth century. Among them were Ed and Doris Love who had this Prairie Style home constructed in 1916. Its bands of…

Sometimes called “labor’s aristocracy,” locomotive engineers were the highest paid workers on the railroad. That fact gave William Kelly, an engineer for the Milwaukee Road, the means to purchase this one-story home. In 1920 he lived here with his…

The stylistic versatility of architect Brynjulf Rivenes is well demonstrated in this distinguished home built for Miles City businessman Harry J. Horton. The simple foursquare plan combines wide eaves, a low hipped roof, and massive brick pillars,…