A wood-frame cigar factory and shooting gallery stood here in 1884. After fire destroyed the buildings in 1886, owner J. A. Danforth quickly rebuilt in brick. Four years later, he added a second story, but the addition was so heavy it damaged the…

In 1883, Wetzstein Hall, a two-story wooden building with a liquor wholesale operation on the first floor and a public hall on the second, stood on this site. In 1902, Fred Pape opened the National Park Steam Laundry here. He purchased the building…

Entrepreneur brothers Tommy and Billy Miles constructed this dignified building in 1903 strategically located across from the Northern Pacific’s new passenger depot. The first floor of the masonry business block provided the booming community with…

As the Northern Pacific Railroad made its push across the upper tier of the western states in the early 1880s, Livingston grew to serve its passengers and crews. Convenient to the shops and yards, the Eastside especially was home to the many blue…

Blue collar railroad workers were the backbone of the Livingston community and many settled in this area opposite the Northern Pacific shops. Between 1900 and 1910, housing for workers began to fill this neighborhood to accommodate the railroad’s…

Expansion of the Northern Pacific Railroad in the early 1900s assured Livingston a bright future, and civic building of this period reflects the high economic and cultural levels achieved by the community. The North Side School, built in 1907 in…

World War II put a damper on the growth of radio broadcasting by freezing expansion of existing stations and disallowing the licensing of new stations. When the freeze finally lifted, KPRK Radio in Livingston was one of the first new postwar…

Born in Vermont in 1842, Napoleon Ebert came to the West from Wisconsin in the 1880s, following the construction of the Northern Pacific railbeds. Ebert found his fortune here in the upper Yellowstone Valley, where he spent several months in a…