Malta, first known as “Siding 54,” took its place along the Hi-Line in 1887 as the Great Northern Railway opened new opportunities. The railroad heavily promoted the area, and by 1910, Malta was the county seat. Longtime residents Lee Edwards and…

Hotel proprietors Clara Lano and Anna Thompson hired contractor Albert Broadland to build this fifty-room apartment building in 1917. They named it the Dyckman after the luxurious Dyckman Hotel in Minneapolis, near where Clara grew up. Clara and…

Austrian-born brewer John V. Petritz moved his saloon and brewery from Walkerville to still-developing Anaconda in 1883. Three years later, he branched into the wholesale liquor business, becoming Anaconda’s sole Pabst Brewing Company distributor.…

J. A. Rose built a one-story blacksmith and wheelwright shop on this corner about 1905, establishing a long tradition of transportation-related businesses on the lot. Rose made and repaired wagon wheels, horse tack, and iron carriage parts. As…

Mercantile owner Forrest M. Mack and partner Alfred Strode built this remarkably well-preserved false-front commercial building in 1912 in the now-defunct town of Gilman, two miles east of Augusta. That year, the Great Northern Railway had founded…

When sisters Marie and Gunelia Brecke opened their first lodging house on North Main Street in 1886, they had to haul water from a nearby well. They soon moved their business to West Broadway and continued to own and manage rooming houses and…

Four Livingston businessmen commissioned architect C. E. Bell to design this two-story commercial block which was built in 1904. The symmetrical building stretched across four lots until its southern bay was demolished c. 1971. Bell moved to…

The block between Oak and Cherry streets was jam-packed with single-family dwellings and boarding houses during Anaconda’s early years. Between 1884 and 1888, Mike and Annie Leonard built their one-story, wood-frame house facing the street, and then…

An 1886 fire destroyed the one-story tin shop and hardware warehouse that originally occupied this lot. Two year later, meat merchant and rancher John Harvat purchased the property. Livingston’s premier Gilded Age architect, I. J. Galbraith,…

This building began as a one-story, wood-frame grocery store on Main Street in 1883. In 1885, owner David Cohen Sr. sided it with brick veneer, giving it a more permanent appearance. Soon after, a fire broke out, destroying nearly everything on the…