Stevensville, officially platted in 1879, was hardly on the map when John and Mary Landram came to the Bitterroot in 1875. Landram, a native of Missouri and a carpenter by trade, put his skills to immediate use helping to build the frame buildings…

In 1905, a devastating fire swept through Stevensville destroying many of the town’s vulnerable wooden buildings. The tragedy prompted local officials to pass an ordinance requiring architects and contractors to build with non-flammable materials.…

The Homestead Act of 1862 drew settlers to the Bitterroot Valley and by the end of the decade, the newly settled community of Etna had established one of the first local school districts. A two-room log schoolhouse was built near this site in 1871.…

In 1901, John Emhoff purchased this property and built a one-story home for himself, his wife, daughter Elizabeth, and twin daughters Lois and Lora. John Emhoff was locally well known as owner and proprietor of the Stevensville Stage and Transport…

The DeNayer House is a fine example of transitional Queen Anne/Colonial Revival style architecture. The combination hipped and gabled roof and irregular floorplan are characteristic of the Queen Anne style while corner pilasters and clapboard siding…

“The music of the carpenter’s hammer is heard in all parts of the city,” reported the Stevensville Register in March 1910. “A sure indication that spring is here.” Construction of the Wilbur Cook house may have contributed to that spring music.…

Stevensville experienced an intense period of economic growth and land speculation fueled by the “apple boom” of 1905-1922. This period in the Bitterroot Valley brought massive subdivision of agricultural lands, ambitious irrigation schemes, and…

The Caple family came to the Burnt Fork in 1884 from Webster County, Missouri. Caple became a successful rancher and real estate agent, profiting from brisk land speculation in the Bitterroot Valley during the early 1900s. Upon retirement from…