The 1868 Laramie Treaty guaranteed the Lakota half of present-day South Dakota and designated an additional 60 million acres in present-day Nebraska, Wyoming, and Montana as “unceded hunting grounds.” After discovery of gold in the Black Hills in…

Aleek-chea-ahoosh, or “Many Achievements,” was a fitting name for the influential Crow chief who was esteemed among his people and honored by both statesmen and presidents. White men called him Plenty Coups for the 80 feathers he wore with earned…

Building contractor Ernest Adler constructed these attached, flat roofed storefronts between 1914 and 1920. A German immigrant, Adler was one of Hardin’s most prolific builders. Situated on the edge of the business district, the one-story brick…

In 1900, John Svaren left his home in Bergen, Norway, to join family in South Dakota. There he learned English before homesteading to North Dakota in 1909. With his bride, Betsy, Svaren arrived in Hardin in 1917 to build a home. He applied his…

Orville Snell Haverfield came to Montana in 1909, newly graduated from St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons. Haverfield set up practice in Hardin and eventually became county physician, health officer, and coroner. During the early years of…

As Hardin’s residential neighborhoods began to take shape during the 1910s and 1920s, the new Craftsman style emerged as a favored design. Its popularity was partly due to the ready availability and low cost of the machine-made, mass-produced…

On May 4, 1917, Hardin celebrated the “formal opening of the Gay block . . . with a grand ball in the south store room of this magnificent structure.” The storage area’s hardwood floor was perfect for dancing, and construction of the two-story brick…