Straddling the McCone and Roosevelt county lines, for many years this was the only bridge over the Missouri River for 350 miles. Between Fort Benton, Montana, and Williston, North Dakota, the bridge connected residents to outside markets and…

Between 1909 and 1918, the homestead boom and expansion of the logging industry dramatically increased traffic in northwest Montana. governments aggressively worked to meet heightened transportation needs by building better roads and bridges. In…

Although heavy rain disrupted the celebrations, it couldn’t dampen the enthusiasm Forsyth residents felt for their new bridge, dedicated on July 4, 1905. Prior to the bridge’s construction, Rosebud County residents had to ford the Yellowstone River…

The Yellowstone River Bridge is the longest truss bridge built in Montana at 1,142 feet. It is also one of the few bridges built in Montana during World War II. During the 1930s, the Montana Highway Department welcomed an influx of New Deal money by…

Madison County commissioners began discussing the feasibility of a road along the Madison River in 1869. When Congress designated Yellowstone a National Park in 1872, the area was accessible only on horseback. It was not until a year later that the…

Before Libby Dam tamed the river, the Kootenai became "a death dealing torrent in high water time." Raging currents regularly shut down ferries, stranding supplies intended for logging and mining camps and keeping north side children from…

Generations of native peoples used this crossing in their seasonal travels to the Great Plains to hunt buffalo. Lewis and Clark christened the river after Secretary of War Henry Dearborn on their trek through the area in 1805, but its location in…

Historic maps show that the area above Reeder’s Alley, known as Reeder’s Gulch, was long undeveloped and virtually inaccessible. The city gave in to local pressure in the early 1890s and began construction of this bridge, first known as the Howie…

In 1913 Deer Lodge County officials decided to build a bridge to span Silver Bow Creek, appropriating $2,067.88 for materials and $265 to H. B. Grant for design specifications. The bridge made passable the county road between the nearby Milwaukee…

The Northern Pacific Railroad platted the townsite of Glendive in 1882 against the arid Montana “badlands.” The location was an ideal supply and distribution center since it was where the railroad first met the Yellowstone River, but Glendive looked…