West Side Neighborhood, Butte

Butte's West Side neighborhood was constructed on the side slopes of Missoula Gulch, which cleaves the heart of this hilly neighborhood. The neighborhood is bounded by Quartz and Copper Streets on the north; on the east by Montana, Idaho and Washington Streets; on the south by Porphyry Street to Jackson, on across Diamond Street to the World Museum of Mining and the Orphan Girl Mine Yard; and on the west from the World Museum of Mining to the foot of Big Butte.

100 South Excelsior

The Classical Revival style is grandly expressed in this exemplary residence of high-fired tan brick, built between 1916 and 1920. A symmetrical façade with central porch, double entry doors, square brick columns, and a central gable over an extended…

1117 West Broadway

Norwegian-born carpenter Albert Broadland arrived in Butte in 1912. The prolific builder constructed nearly half the homes in the Rowe Addition on the Flats, the elegant Finlan Hotel, and many Craftsman style bungalows in Uptown. Built circa 1916,…

1135 West Mercury

Irish immigrant Charles Jenks was the first resident of this elaborate Craftsman style bungalow. Jenks, his wife Lena, and their small daughter moved into the new residence in 1916. As a cashier at the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, Jenks was a…

1340 West Granite

Mature landscaping surrounds this cozy cottage bungalow built circa 1915. Colin L. Christie and his wife Ruth built the home where they raised two sons. Ruth was the daughter of Judge John Lindsay, who came to Butte in 1895 as secretary and legal…

205 North Washington

Neoclassical design elements define this substantial two-story brick home built in 1891. Dentils ornament the eaveline, multi-pane windows dominate the symmetrical front façade, and doubled columns provide support for what was once a full-length…

301 North Crystal

Interesting window placement is a hallmark of prominent Butte architect Charles M. Prentice and his own modified Italianate style residence, built circa 1898, provides an eye-catching example. Prentice alternated panels of full and half windows,…

315 West Broadway

Judge John McHatton, his wife, Rose, and their children made their home in this two-and-one-half-story Queen Anne style residence from 1895 until 1918. Built in 1892, the elegant brick and clapboard home designed by Butte architect John Patterson…

402-412 West Mercury

Apartments played an integral part in Butte’s residential history as an alternative to the single family home. Housing was scarce in this crowded urban industrial center at the turn of the century. Apartment living offered more privacy and…

403-405 West Granite

Hardware merchant William M. Jack built this two-story dwelling circa 1890. Scottish-born Jack was a dealer in hardware, tinware, stoves, pumps, and mining equipment. A collection of several outbuildings, a small house, two large warehouses for…

403-407 West Mercury

The gambrel roof of this splendid 1890s bay-fronted duplex readily illustrates how a typical turn-of-the-century architectural plan could be adapted to achieve individual distinction. Unusual details in a botanical motif include leaf-like roof…

410 West Granite

“Next to mining and smelting, litigation is the chief industry of Butte, and highly profitable to the lawyers,” reported a writer in 1901. One of Butte’s many lawyers, Frank T. McBride arrived in Montana in 1879. He and his wife, Rose, and son,…

412 West Broadway

In 1890, a wooden shotgun house stood at 412 West Broadway, while a substantial brick residence stood to the east. When wholesale produce merchant H. E. Morier and his wife, Teresa, decided to build this two-story home in 1907, they discovered that…

414 West Granite

Butte’s architectural diversity is legendary, and this Mission style home adds to that reputation. The Mission style traces its roots to Hispanic California and in Montana, it most frequently appears in civic, rather than residential, buildings.…

423-425 West Mercury

Contractor Fergus Kelley spent $4,000 building this handsome two-apartment residence in September 1900. He and wife Katherine, a well-known Butte vocalist and music teacher, lived at number 423 and rented the other half to tenants. In the early…

431 West Mercury

A round turreted entry with an elaborate porch is the focal point of this Queen Anne style home. Built circa 1890, its prefabricated decorative features were designed to add individuality and elegance to the homes of Butte’s working class. Turned…

502 West Park Street

As Butte boomed from 3,300 people in 1880 to over 20,000 in 1890 and over 45,000 in 1900, rentals remained in great demand. Built before 1891, this two-story brick building, which now houses four units, originally contained eight separate apartments.…

510 West Galena Street

William Mosby, proprietor of the King and Mosby Saloon, acquired this property in 1889. By 1890, a one-story residence with a square corner bay occupied the lot. Mosby and his wife, Eliza, sold the house for $2,000 to Jeremiah and Kate Mullins in…

625-627 West Park

Real estate developers platted much of Butte's West Side in 1889, anticipating the building boom that soon followed. Among the many residences constructed in 1890 was this one-story duplex, which owner George E. Clark likely built as an…

633-639 West Park

Grocer John L. Carroll chose a prime location to build a four-family flat in 1914. Butte’s finest houses stood two blocks west, and the large, two-story Greek Revival building next door since demolished housed the Woman’s Club. Its 225 active…

635 West Granite

“For years, it has been almost impossible to accommodate all the people with comfortable houses or apartments,” a Butte newspaper reported in 1901. “The city is growing very fast, and the builders have all they can do to put up enough buildings to…

803 West Granite

Prominently situated on a corner lot, this Queen Anne style residence is a neighborhood showpiece. Band leader Sam Treloar had the brick-veneered house constructed in 1901, possibly as an investment property. The Cornish bandmaster is best known as…

803 West Park

The Queen Anne style is beautifully expressed in this fashionable “gay nineties” residence of Arthur H. Mueller, longtime president of the Centennial Brewing Company. Built in 1895, it was also home to Mueller’s in-laws, police court judge James C.…

805 West Granite

Architect J. Roy McGlauflin designed this Queen Anne style home in 1898 during Butte’s second building boom. Ornamental brackets beneath wide gable trim draw attention to the gable end, decorated with fish-scale shingles. McGlauflin placed the…

815 West Granite

Butte boomed as copper production doubled in the 1890s. The city issued 1,684 building permits between 1897 and 1898 as carpenters worked furiously to keep up with the demand for housing. The availability of mass-produced decoration allowed builders…

815-817 West Mercury

Beautiful brickwork crowns this grand bay-fronted flat, built in 1904. Architectural highlights include a two-story polygonal bay, transomed entries, and arched windows trimmed in rough-faced granite. Originally built as a duplex, Queen Anne style…

817 West Galena Street

Butte’s giant copper industry brought workers crowding into every available space. Residential building lots were at a premium and yards nearly nonexistent at the end of the nineteenth century. This Queen Anne style cottage, built circa 1897,…

821 West Granite

In 1890, the sound of hammers echoed throughout Butte’s West Side, a result of the community’s phenomenal growth as it converted from a silver town to a copper metropolis. Butte grew over two hundred percent during the 1880s, and this home was one of…

822-824 West Park

Tucked snugly between its neighbors, this modified Queen Anne style home began as a one-story cottage designed by architect William White and built in July of 1897. Albert Elliot, an electrician for the Montana Electric Company, was an early resident…

823 West Park

James H. Lynch was a man of many hats. Lumber, livery, mine development, hotel management, and wholesale liquor are but a few of his successful business ventures. A founder of the Silver Bow National Bank, Lynch also owned substantial Butte real…

825 West Mercury Street

Wealthy banker Nesbit Rochester bought this bay-fronted brick building as an investment property during the summer of 1906. The building was listed among other “large homes” for sale that summer for $4,500. Nesbit and family lived just a few doors…

825 West Park

The gables, porches, and elegant detailing of the Victorian-era homes along this picturesque block compose a neighborhood streetscape reminiscent of San Francisco. This distinguished example, built circa 1893, was once the exact twin of its next door…

827 West Park

Emerson B. Weirick purchased the land to build this home in 1897 for a total of thirty dollars. Construction of the residence began that same year. Preeminent Butte architect W. A. O’Brien designed the home and Fergus Kelley served as contractor.…

831 West Granite

The Queen Anne style is beautifully interpreted in this Victorian-era showpiece built circa 1891. The T-shaped residence features unusual elements including mock brick quoins at the corners and a large front window with an arched upper light of…

832 West Park

Jennie Tallant, a founding member of the Montana Society Daughters of the American Revolution, and her husband, Walter, were early residents of this home. Named first regent of the Silver Bow DAR chapter in 1897, Jennie became the third state regent…

834 West Quartz

As its population tripled in the 1890s, Butte began its transformation from a mining camp to a small city. The percentage of married men grew by 10 percent, and local builders worked busily to fulfill the increasing demand for single-family homes.…

843 West Broadway

James H. Monteath, assistant manager of the Inter-Mountain Publishing Company and assistant secretary of the Aetna Savings and Trust Company, was the original owner of this lovely two-story home built of frame with brick veneer circa 1891. A graceful…

856 West Granite

Stone, brick, and wood combine to add texture to this Queen Anne style residence, whose design includes a projecting bay and a small turret topped by a metal finial. Built before 1900, the house originally featured an open front porch. Insurance…

923 West Mercury

In 1896, W. Mead Hanson departed Utah for Butte with his wife, Nellie, and their children. Leaving his job as mail clerk for a short-gauge railroad, the thirty-two-year-old Mead opened a cigar store in the Lewishon Building in the heart of Uptown. By…

Albert J. Campbell Residence

Architect William A. O’Brien designed and built this striking home in 1906 for ACM attorney Albert J. Campbell. The massive brick-veneered residence demonstrates O’Brien’s bold employment of the new Prairie style promoted by Chicago architect Frank…

Andrew Jackson Davis Home

The builder of this residence was the second of three Butte men of the same name. The elder A. J. Davis (1819-1890) was said to have been Butte’s first millionaire and founded the predecessor to the First National Bank of Butte in 1877. His nephew…

Boucher - Walker Home

Butte as melting pot is well-chronicled in this Queen Anne style mix of high gables and multi-paned windows. Its appearance is typically English, as is the interior décor, yet it was built by a French native and occupied for much of its life by…

Campana Building

Swiss-born Rocco Campana came to Butte in 1886 when it was still a mining camp with a precarious future. Rocco first opened a saloon then, confident of the town’s potential, invested his savings in property on this corner. By 1890, three brothers had…

Charles Walker Clark Mansion

The eldest son of copper king William Clark built this twenty-six-room mansion for his bride, Katherine Quinn Roberts, in 1898. Massachusetts architect Will Aldrich reputedly modeled the residence after a French chateau the couple visited while…

Chope Residence

Paired Ionic columns support a classical one-story porch while the parapet atop the curved two-story bay window evokes the image of a medieval castle. Kitty Paxson and her husband, pharmacist Robert Paxson, lived in the elegant brick residence in…

Clark Duplex

H. M. Patterson, Butte’s most gifted architect, designed four identical duplexes along this block in 1899 for William A. Clark, Jr., the son of copper king W. A. Clark. Two other duplexes around the corners on Silver and Mercury were also designed by…

Dr. Donald Campbell Residence

Elaborate and diverse architecture characterizes the homes along this stretch of Broadway today, but during the 1880s rather modest dwellings lined the street. This was one of Butte’s first settled neighborhoods and historic maps indicate that the…

Dr. John D. McGregor Residence

Newly graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in veterinary surgery, Dr. John D. McGregor arrived in the Mining City in 1889. Copper king Marcus Daly launched the young doctor’s career, hiring him to care for horses on the Butte hill.…

Eugene Carroll House

A corner location affords two views of this captivating home, built in the mid-1880s and first owned by Butte attorney Thomas Napton. By 1897, Eugene Carroll, who later became the long-time vice president and manager of the Butte Water Company, owned…

Evans Residence

Architect William A. O’Brien designed this grandly scaled Craftsman style bungalow for prominenet attorney Lewis O. Evans circa 1906. The stunning home incorporates Craftsman style characteristics, but its magnificent gabled dormers and prominent…

First Church of Christ, Scientist

Christian Science was a young religion when believers first gathered in a private Butte home in 1893; according to church teachings, Mary Baker Eddy discovered this system of prayer-based healing in 1866. The congregation grew rapidly, and Butte’s…

Forestell Flats

The impressive appearance of this 1906 bay-fronted multi-family dwelling, a common building type in early day Butte, reflects a compromise between the desire for a single-family home and the need for living space in this city bursting with…

Galbraith Residence

A decorative iron fence symbolically separates this one-and-one-half-story brick residence from the street—reflecting the Victorian-era ideal of the home as a sanctuary removed from worldly bustle. Constructed between 1900 and 1908, the residence…

Gillies/Parent House

This showcase Queen Anne style home adds ambiance to one of Butte’s most prominent blocks. An elegant brick arch, flared overhangs accentuated with wooden brackets, projecting oriel windows, a centered Palladian window, and an extended gable…

Harlow Pease House

Attorney John B. Wellcome, later implicated in the illegal shenanigans orchestrated by William Clark in his bid for the U.S. Senate, probably built this residence before he sold the property to Henry G. Hawes in 1890. This impressive Shingle style…

Harry D'Acheul Residence

A gentle arch, a simple balustrade, and a pair of sloping columns frame the entrance of this quietly elegant residence dating to the mid-1880s. An exceptional example of the hip-roofed cottage with a central gable, the well-preserved Victorian-era…

Harry W. Turner Residence

Local legend has it that in 1915, Harry W. Turner jacked up the one-story 1890s house on this lot and constructed a new first floor beneath it. Telltale evidence is found in the twelve-foot first-floor ceilings—a height not typically found in…

Hawke Residence

John and Elizabeth Hawke moved into their newly constructed home circa 1903. The brick-veneered residence features an elegant two-story bay, which, along with the low hipped roofline and the brackets under the wide, projecting eaves, reflects the…

Henry Jacobs House

Henry Jacobs, Butte’s first mayor 1879-80, was a native of Baden, Germany. He immigrated to America’s South at the age of nine and to Montana in 1866, where he established the H. Jacobs and Company clothing store. He and his wife, Adele, completed…

Henry Kroger Residence

Prominent contractor and real estate developer Charles Passmore, who advertised construction of homes on the installment plan, built this Queen Anne style residence in 1896. By 1897, it was home to Henry and Lavinia Kroger and their young daughter,…

Hodgens / Ryan Home

Thomas Hodgens, who held the prestigious position of cashier at the State Savings Bank, was the first owner of this magnificent T-shaped Classical Revival style residence built in 1899. Second owner John D. Ryan purchased the home in 1905. Ryan rose…

J. Fred and Sophia Gamer Residence

Ornamental wooden brackets tucked under wide overhanging eaves, spacious dormers, exposed rafter tails, and a full-length front porch reflect the Craftsman style’s influence on this two-story residence. The style was initially touted as “the ideal…

John M. Orton Residence

A prominent place at the top of West Park Street emphasizes the importance of this 1916 Craftsman style residence. Its first owner was James M. Orton, one of eight talented brothers who brought music to generations of residents in the Mining City.…

James Ross Clark Residence

The exceptional preservation of this very elegant home can be attributed to the meticulous care of its few long-term owners. Built circa 1886-1888, the first resident was James Ross Clark, brother of copper magnate W. A. Clark. By 1906, John…

John Benton Leggat Residence

Elaborate and elegant on its eye-catching corner, this well-tended gabled and turreted Victorian-era home was built circa 1897 for mining engineer J. Benton Leggat. Bowed glass, a diamond-paned window, and dentils under all the eaves spark its…

John E. Davis Home

A myriad of Victorian-era details makes this splendid residence and its next-door neighbor, built by brothers John E. and A. J. Davis, true period showcases. Known as the “Twin Sisters,” these mirror-image homes were constructed in 1891 for the…

John Gillie Home

Armed with a degree in mining engineering, Canadian John Gillie arrived in Butte via stagecoach on April 6, 1880. The mining camp was so crowded that even hotel floor space rented at a premium. Gillie bedded down in in the hayloft of a barn, a rude…

Kelley Mansion

A large circular portico with surrounding Ionic columns dominates the facade of this grand residence, constructed in 1906 for Cornelius “Con” Kelley and his wife Mary for the then princely sum of $20,000. Butte architect W.A. O'Brien's…

Largey Flats

Patrick A. Largey, Butte’s “fourth copper king,” got his start freighting goods into early-day Virginia City. After he settled in Butte, Largey’s many business interests included founding both the Inter-Mountain newspaper and the State Savings Bank.…

Lee Mantle House

This splendid, highly visible Victorian-era residence was the home of politician Lee Mantle, who was elected to the territorial legislature in 1882, served as a U.S. Senator from 1895 to 1899, and as mayor of Butte in 1892. That same year local…

Leonard Apartments

Turn-of-the-twentieth-century social critics viewed apartment living as “the most dangerous enemy American domesticity has had to encounter.” Butte investors ignored this admonition, constructing the fashionable Leonard Apartments in 1906 to help…

Lynch Residence

In 1900, Sixth Ward alderman and assayer Albert G. Sienbenaler lived here, in what was then a one-story residence. The characteristic Queen Anne style home boasted a polygonal bay and open front porch. Some time before 1916, owners added a second…

M.J. Connell House

Exceptionally fine craftsmanship and an intriguing combination of styles characterize this early and very elegant brick-veneered home, built in 1880. In 1892, dry goods merchant Michael J. Connell commissioned local architect Charles Prentice, known…

Montana Tech Campus

The Enabling Act of 1889 laid the foundation for the Montana School of Mines, providing for the first federal land grants for the establishment of mining schools. This landmark provision thus recognized the significance of mining industries to the…

Montana Tech Campus Engineering Building

The north half of this building was constructed in 1910 as a gymnasium and auditorium, designed by noted Montana architect C. S. Haire. It was the third campus building. As Montana Tech grew during the next decade, expansion became crucial.…

Montana Tech Campus Gymnasium

When the original campus gymnasium became the Engineering Building in 1923, plans were begun for a replacement. This splendid facility was completed in 1925 at a cost of $125,000. A swimming pool, handball courts, showers, and locker rooms comprised…

Montana Tech Campus Library / Museum

The placement of this building on the corner overlooking Leonard Field and Summit Valley in 1939 added balance to the existing Montana Tech buildings and rounded out the campus. Designed by Butte architect Walter A. Arnold and constructed at a cost…

Montana Tech Campus Main Hall

Montana architect John C. Paulsen designed this first campus building, completed in 1897, thereby setting the standard for later buildings on the school grounds. Paulsen, who died before its completion, was one of the Rocky Mountain region’s most…

Montana Tech Campus Metallurgy Building

Expansion of the campus in 1923 included the construction of this large building to house classrooms and laboratories for ore dressing, metallurgical research, ceramics, and chemistry. Architects Floyd Hamill of Butte and George Carsley, widely…

Montana Tech Campus Mill Building

Only nine of Main Hall’s twenty-five rooms were originally furnace heated. To remedy that situation, the mill building was constructed during 1907 and 1908 to house a large heating plant. This second campus building furnished steam heat to Main Hall…

Montana Tech Campus President's Residence

Francis A. Thomson was the first school president to enjoy this fine residence, completed during his tenure in 1936. Thomson had declared upon his arrival in 1928 that, because of its barren grounds, the school had the “ugliest campus of any…

Montana Tech Campus Residence Halls

The Montana School of Mines continued to grow even during the lean years of the Great Depression. One of the challenges facing early students was locating living quarters within a reasonable distance of the school. Credit for the building of this…

Mueller Apartments

Turn-of-the-century critics called apartment living “a shortcut . . . to the divorce court.” These moralists believed that the proximity of bedrooms to living areas—and the easy access to both by neighbors—encouraged promiscuity, while apartment…

Newton / McCrimmon House

Lively and diverse architectural styles distinguish this part of Butte, where grand residences built for prominent citizens intermingle with simpler homes, churches, and a few businesses. H. M. Patterson, author of some of Butte’s most captivating…

Orphan Girl Mine

From the time it was located in 1875 until it was purchased by Marcus Daly and associates in 1879, ownership of fractional shares in the Orphan Girl Mine changed hands faster than the ante in a poker game. The Orphan Girl eventually operated to a…

Paul Clark Home

The Associated Charities of Butte was organized during the late 1880s “to help the worthy poor to help themselves.” While the early group focused on distributing food and clothing to the needy, the children’s home at 542 Nevada soon became the pivot…

Powers Residence

For almost one hundred years, members of a single family lived in this Queen Anne style cottage. Carpenter R. R. Williams, who lived in the duplex next door, built the residence in 1898. By 1900, Irish immigrants John and Catherine Powers had…

Renick House

This Victorian-era residence exhibits many Queen Anne details, including an ornate floral pattern in the transom above the windows and a large sunray motif in the gable. The interior boasts three hand-milled fireplaces, oak doors, a stunning white…

Scovil Residence

John Scovil worked as a watchman for the Anaconda Company after he first arrived in Montana in 1884. He opened a laundry in 1894; six years later he purchased the Union Laundry in Butte. By 1911, Scovil and a partner owned almost all of the laundries…

St. John's Episcopal Church

A small stone building erected on this site in 1881 was one of Butte’s first churches. After 1900, the church was remodeled several times, incorporating the original building into a much larger structure. When fire swept through the chancel in 1919,…

St. Patrick's Convent

Irish, Cornish, German, Finnish, Italian, and Slavic immigrants poured into the rough mining town of Butte during the 1880s. As the majority of these newcomers were Catholic and many brought their families, St. Patrick’s Parish soon had need of a…

St. Patrick's Rectory

Father Peter DeSiere became pastor of St. Patrick’s in 1893 and served the parish well for twenty-five years. At the time of his death in 1918, Butte had achieved its peak population. As St. Patrick’s Parish likewise expanded under Father DeSiere, so…

The Lillie

Mrs. Lillie, as many tenants knew her, managed this apartment building from her first-floor unit for nearly fifty years. Architect Marin D. Kern designed the building in 1908 for Lillie and her husband John R. Ross. It was originally two stories with…

Virginia Apartments

Excellence of design, thoughtful planning and careful owners have allowed this exceptional apartment building to survive the test of time. Essentially unchanged inside and out, the four-story building on its prominent corner is an excellent example…

W.A. Clark Jr. Carriage House

The opulent stables and carriage house of William A. Clark, Jr., son of copper king millionaire William A. Clark, bear the unmistakable hallmark of Butte architect H. M. Patterson. The symmetrical Renaissance Revival design features a grand entry…

W.A. Clark Jr. Home

A unique blend of historical elements and details characterize the home of W. A. Clark Jr., built in conjunction with the adjacent carriage house in 1900. H. M. Patterson’s asymmetrical design features a granite coursed ashlar foundation, rusticated…

William A. Clark Mansion

Self-made multimillionaire William Clark spent an estimated $260,000 on the construction of this splendid thirty-two-room residence between 1884 and 1888. Though an astounding sum, that figure represented only a half-day’s earnings out of Clark’s…

William Symons Residence

A graceful rounded portico with Ionic columns and a central square bay with French doors highlight the perfect symmetry of this grand Classical Revival style residence of tan brick veneer and red sandstone trim. Elegant details include elaborate…

Wynne / Conroy Residence

Scattered development marked this Butte neighborhood during the 1890s as the population grew and the demand for all types of housing increased. By 1900, few lots remained on this side of the block. Merchandise broker E. Walter Wynne, at this address…

Y.M.C.A.

The cornerstone was laid in 1917 for this multi-purpose facility, designed by international Y.M.C.A architects. All contracting, however, went to local firms. The $350,000 building opened in 1919, entirely paid for by citizens’ contributions and…