One of a network of Jewish merchants who supplied miners in the Rocky Mountain West, nineteen-year-old Benjamin Pizer arrived in Helena from Poland with his wife Jessie Silverman and their newborn son David in 1869. With limited capital, he…

During the 1880s masonry structures began to replace wood-framed buildings from the mining camp days to form the present town. George H. Harn, who at that time ran one of two local brickyards, probably built this fine residence with his own bricks.…

Colonel J. W. Morse built Morse Hall in 1887. This elaborately detailed public lecture hall also served as county courthouse after 1893, as well as an opera house, town hall, library, and general community center. Its splendid second-story dance…

Prominent businessman Angus A. McDonald constructed this two-story masonry theater in 1891. A metal-covered stage loft rises above the roof as evidence of the structure’s historic function. Beneath the south end were dressing rooms for the traveling…

A second-story walkway originally connected this three-story masonry building with the Kaiser House, affording the busy establishment more boarding rooms. Constructed circa 1890, its gabled dormers in a metal mansard roof present an appearance…

Michael Kaiser, founder of the Philipsburg Water Company, built this grand hotel in 1881. One of Philipsburg’s oldest masonry structures, the original hotel boasted a wraparound porch extending halfway around the building. Second-story French doors,…

Most of Philipsburg’s original wooden commercial structures were later rebuilt of brick, but this last-remaining frame boardinghouse escaped such a fate. The two-and-one-half-story establishment, built in 1880, was run by Honora Hynes until the…

Built circa 1887, Lutey’s Grocery and the Barrett and Jacky Harness Shop originally shared occupancy of this one-story commercial building. By the 1890s, Valentine Jacky shared the building with C. T. Huffman, who supplied groceries to Philipsburg…