East Main Street Historic District

The development of this elegant residential neighborhood reflects Miles City's second growth spurt in the early twentieth century. Although the population of this "cowtown" waned between 1890 and 1905, the advent of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad in 1908 and the 1909 Enlarged Homestead Act brought a resurgence of energy and an influx of new residents. The need for more housing generated a construction boom, lasting into the 1920s, which focused upon this heretofore unimproved area. Speculators, contractors, and homebuilders favored this quieter area where individualism could be expressed through architecture. Sweeping lawns and streets lined with elm, cottonwood, and green ash trees complement the cottages and foursquares in Craftsman, Prairie, Mission, and Classical Revival styles that unify this dignified neighborhood. Occasional Queen Anne, Dutch Colonial Revival, and other styles add a pleasing diversity. Plan books offered contractors and builders like Carl Anderson, O. M. Lanphear, and N. P. Nelson stylish and less expensive designs for potential homeowners. Even so, the district embraces many of the area's most architecturally significant homes, revealing the talents of such prominent architects as Charles S. Haire, Brynjulf Rivenes, and Casper Strom. It is this unique blending of styles and craftsmen that conveys the prosperity, optimism, and importance of Miles City during this period of expansion.

2008 Main Street

High maintenance steam engines required railroads to locate large repair shops every two hundred miles. After the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad chose Miles City for a division point in 1907, the town grew rapidly. Population…

Anderson Bungalow

Real estate speculation abounded in the East Main district when carpenter Ernest Anderson built this lovely one-and-a-half-story bungalow in 1916. Its large front porch, supported by heavy, tapered columns, and its low-pitched roofs with overhanging…

Coleman Residence

The steamer Far West carried Irish immigrant James Coleman to Fort Keogh in 1876. After working for the army sutler, Coleman moved into Miles City, where he managed a saloon frequented by army regulars. In 1882, he married his Irish bride, Margaret…

Foster House

This American foursquare style home appears to have been designed by prominent architect Brynjulf Rivenes. Built between 1910 and 1914 for businessman George Foster, its compact simplicity is an elegant, individual statement of the prosperity Miles…

Dr. Gray Residence

A sophisticated blend of Classical elements characterizes this intimately elegant residence that, despite its modest size, easily rivals the district’s grander “high style” homes. Built in 1907, the residence was then “out in the country,” its urbane…

Harry J. Horton Residence

The stylistic versatility of architect Brynjulf Rivenes is well demonstrated in this distinguished home built for Miles City businessman Harry J. Horton. The simple foursquare plan combines wide eaves, a low hipped roof, and massive brick pillars,…

Kelly Residence

Sometimes called “labor’s aristocracy,” locomotive engineers were the highest paid workers on the railroad. That fact gave William Kelly, an engineer for the Milwaukee Road, the means to purchase this one-story home. In 1920 he lived here with his…

Ed and Doris Love House

Wealthy Miles City residents looked to the undeveloped area east of the Northern Pacific tracks to build their homes in the early twentieth century. Among them were Ed and Doris Love who had this Prairie Style home constructed in 1916. Its bands of…

Lukes / Love House

Built for C. N. and Louise E. Lukes in 1911, the home is also known as the Ed Love House. Lukes was cashier of the Commercial State Bank and after the deaths of C. N. and Louise in 1929, ownership passed to their daughter, Doris Lukes Love, and her…

Pope House

A low-pitched hipped roof, an asymmetrical open front porch with massive square porch supports, clean lines, and wide overhanging eaves mark the two-story Pope residence as a classic example of the Prairie style. Builder Thomas Burton clad the…

Rinehart House

Nature, comfort, simplicity, honesty, and integrity were ideals incorporated into early-twentieth-century architecture. This Craftsman style bungalow is an exceptional expression of those ideals. Its compact floorplan and modestly adorned exterior…

Dr. A.J. Schrumpf Residence

Builder/contractor Oren M. Lanphear experimented with a variety of influences in this 1908 residence, which was the first home in Miles City to fully employ the American Foursquare design. Simplicity and practicality were the essence of this…

Stacy Residence

Determined to bring the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad to Miles City, land developer, cattleman, and banker Lorenzo Stacy organized his fellow businessmen to secure and donate property for the railroad’s right-of-way. In 1908, the…

First Christian Church

Accompanied by popular singing evangelist C. M. Ridenour of Fort Benton, J. S. Raum preached the Christian Church’s first service in Miles City in 1910. Forty-four people attended. Early church membership was diverse, including a successful attorney,…

Cresap/Smart House

Hardware store owner, banker, and real estate developer George Miles, nephew of Colonel Nelson A. Miles, hired a contractor to build this hipped-roof cottage around 1910. Following completion of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad…