Filed Under Eureka

Farmers and Merchants State Bank

The Townsite Company began promoting Eureka’s agricultural potential in 1907, spurring the need for a local bank. Kalispell and area investors responded by subscribing $25,000 to fill this need. When the bank opened in 1908 on its prominent corner, the Tobacco Plains Journal pronounced it “without doubt the handsomest brick structure” in the western part of the county, and the Kalispell Journal declared the town quite fortunate since “the most important factor in the development of a new country is a solid banking institution.” The $12,000 bank building featured the most up-to-date safe and interior furnishings from Chicago. The Townsite Company shared the bank’s ground floor while the town rented the upstairs for police court and council chambers for $14 a month. The bank’s investors had promised a “good, wide awake man at the helm” and named one of their own, C. A. Hamann of Kalispell, bank president. Deposits of more than $7,000 on opening day were a grand prelude to the bank’s early success, but heavy irrigation investments and closure of the local lumber mill resulted in its failure in 1925. Subsequent owners included the first town clerk, H. G. Pomeroy, and former bank board member and county sheriff Frank Baney. Simple lines and elegant brickwork provide an excellent example of Western Commercial architecture while an unusual wide central arch with a multi-paned cut-glass transom adds particular distinction to this long familiar landmark. Sensitive restoration of the first floor has preserved the original open commercial space, tin ceiling, and wood trim.

Images

Farmers and Merchants State Bank Farmers and Merchants State Bank, facing southwest on Dewey Avenue near corner of Dewey Avenue and 3rd Street, front/side view. Source: MontanaPictures.net Creator: MontanaPictures.net Date: July 2008

Location

223 Dewey Avenue, Eureka, Montana | Private

Metadata

The Montana National Register Sign Program, “Farmers and Merchants State Bank,” Historic Montana, accessed February 4, 2023, https://historicmt.org/items/show/838.